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German Non-Alcoholic Beer Promoted As Sports Drink

BeerOther Beverage
02.22.2011

Germany's Andrea Henkel enjoys an Erdinger Alkoholfrei after finishing second in the World Cup biathlon women's 12.5 km mass start last week. (Don Emmert/AFP/Getty Images)

Germany’s Andrea Henkel enjoys an Erdinger Alkoholfrei after finishing second in the World Cup biathlon women’s 12.5 km mass start last week. (Don Emmert/AFP/Getty Images)

A German non-alcoholic beer has been creating some buzz recently (or lack thereof..) with their claims that the alcohol-free version of their beer is a great post-workout recovery drink and a good alternative to sports drinks such as Gatorade. Erdinger of Erding, Germany says their Alkoholfrei beer is great for athletes as it’s an isotonic beverage, replenishing much needed vitamins and salts lost when an athlete sweats. Beer is also primarily water and very rich in carbohydrates and one doesn’t need to worry about the jitters of an energy drink and excessive caffeine or the buzz of real beer, both of which can lead to further dehydration.

How are athletes reacting? Surprisingly well as it is actually showing up on podiums around the world, proudly touted in huge glasses, and as far away from Germany as the World Cup Biathlon held this month in northern Maine.

Mutineer will be following this closely.



Comments

  1. Tweets that mention German Non-Alcoholic Beer Promoted As Sports Drink | Mutineer Magazine -- Topsy.com | Tuesday, February 22, 2011

    […] This post was mentioned on Twitter by mutineermag, Duane Pemberton, Stefanie Corrigan, Susan Rice, WineBlogFeed and others. WineBlogFeed said: German Non-Alcoholic Beer Promoted As Sports Drink http://bit.ly/g7p0SN #Wine […]


  2. Chelsey @ Chew with Your Mouth Open | Wednesday, February 23, 2011

    I have been reading up on this as well. It’s definintely an up and coming area, especially since many marathons and sporting events, such as the Warrior Dash support post-event beer consumption. Clinical sports nutrition studies to date show that certain types of carbohydrates are more effective than others in replacing the glycogen lost during intense physical activity (60+ minutes). I would love to start seeing clinical studies of how craft beers function in the body as a recovery drink.


  3. Brian Kropf | Wednesday, February 23, 2011

    I’d be interested as well. I’ve seen some nutritionists speak about it and they definitely agree that it’s certainly better than real beer, but they’re not sure what else after that. We’ll see!


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