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Babies in Bars?

Beverage NewsOther Beverage
03.02.2010
Alans First Beer

Mutineer Magazine Editor Alan Kropf’s first beer. Delicious.

Babies in bars? If the baby is clever enough to sneak into a bar, it probably deserves to be there. Others see it differently. As reported by CNN.com:

Single hipsters and others without (and sometimes with) kids complain about being asked to watch their language, to not smoke outdoors near strollers and to keep their drunk friends under control so as not to scare the little ones. They don’t want to feel pressure to play peekaboo. They want to cry over their beers, they say, without having an infant drown them out. If anyone is spitting up, they want it to be them.

“I will get up on the subway for kids. I will be tolerant of them kicking the back of my seat while seeing a G-rated movie. But let me have my bars,” said Julieanne Smolinski, 26, who feels guilty sucking down suds in front of staring 5-year-olds. The adults who bring their offspring to bars, she suggests, are “clinging to their youth.”

Even more concerning is a Baby Fine Beverage Ambassador named Sasha Raven Gross that is apparently stealing all my moves:

From time to time, Sasha Raven Gross can be seen teetering around a neighborhood drinking hole. She flirts with strangers, talks gibberish and sometimes spins in circles for no apparent reason until she falls down. In one hand is her liquid of choice — watered-down orange juice in a sippy cup.



Comments

  1. Greg | Tuesday, March 2, 2010

    If I get drunk and fall over your stroller, squashing your infant into mash, it’s your bad for bringing a baby into that environment. News flash… you have a baby. Sorry Charlie, but the party is over. OVER. You are a parent. You have your beer at home, you read to that child and do something constructive that might increase it’s intelligent quotient early enough that it doesn’t have fleeting memories of loud, drunken bar people in it’s head. Maybe one day it will grow up to be smarter and more ambitious than it’s parent.

    On the flipside, as a San Diego resident and fan of our craft beer, there are PLENTY of great baby-friendly breweries/restaurants (Stone, Pizzaport to name a few) that one could sit and enjoy beer in a “bar-environment”.

    However, if I’m at the average dive/sports/neighborhood bar and you have a kid/baby there, I’ll probably tell you to your face to beat it. Maybe put out my smoke on the baby… nah I’m kidding. But I will suggest that perhaps this is not the best environment for a young child. Especially when the toddler age is when the kid is most like a sponge.

    So no, absolutely inappropriate.


  2. Julie | Tuesday, March 2, 2010

    Circa 1985: Young Alan is slurping up the last few drops of his fathers Old Milwaukee. This was of course before Alan taught us any better! Who knew?


  3. Erin | Wednesday, March 3, 2010

    I need to dig out the photos of my first beer. I was one and it was the first and last Budweiser I’ve ever had.

    I don’t think responsible drinking should be treated as taboo and hidden from children, like a lot of younger parents seem to think these days. My bff and her husband pop into the pub for a pint with their little one all the time. For me it is like any other place, parents need to keep their kid and themselves in check. They need to use their heads and realize that a smoky bar might not be the right atmosphere and that a screaming child should be taken home.


  4. The Beer Wench | Wednesday, March 3, 2010

    It is odd that you just posted this article as I just had a woman from NBC ask me YESTERDAY about “baby friendly” bars in the San Francisco Bay Area.

    The fact that she asked ME about it is rather ironic.

    You see, I am the biggest advocate of childless bars. This is not because I think that parents are not humans and that bearing children should stricken one’s right to visit a bar.

    I am anti-babies in bars because I have worked in several bars. I don’t care how careful a parent thinks that he or she is, bars are dangerous. And I think that babies in [most bars, especially past a certain hour] are inappropriate. For several reasons.

    1. The patrons are unreliable and unpredictable. In a bar that serves alcohol, there is a higher chance of drunkeness. And drunk people are not smart. They stagger, they drop and spill things, they run into people.

    2. Bars tend to be “faster” paced environments. The servers are buzzing around trying to meet the demands of the guests. Accidents are more likely to happen – especially with drunk customers. And the last thing that the cocktail servers want to do is slow down to watch out for babies.

    3. CRYING. It is annoying. Yes, I get it. Babies cry. But guess what, deal with it. It was your choice to have the baby. However, it was not my choice to have the baby cry and interrupt my night. Accept responsibility and do not afflict the rest of us with the pain of hearing a child cry.

    4. Strollers take up space. They get in the way of servers being able to properly perform their job. Clutter increases the likelihood of accidents.

    5. And parents, if you are in a bar … you obviously intend on drinking. So do you really think it is responsible of YOURSELF to drink with a baby in your arms?

    I get it. Parents are humans. But if they have the ability to spend money in a bar, they have the money to spend on a babysitter. Simple as that.

    Off my soap box,

    Ashley

    PS: My uterus hurts.


  5. Scott | Wednesday, March 3, 2010

    Yikes! As a parent, and not a young one (turning 40 next year), these comments are a bit harsh, unrealistic and ignorant.

    Do you people honestly believe once you have kids, that you shouldn’t go out anymore? Do you think it’s always convenient to get a babysitter, especially at the last minute? It is absolutely unrealistic to believe that a parent should never go out with their children. Grow up.

    I get a babysitter when I can, but in a pinch, sorry, I’m bringing my kid with me. But why should I shelter my child from this environment? I shouldn’t. I read to my kid everyday already. I do homework with my kids, play with them, etc. Telling me to stay home and do something “constructive” is absolute ignorance. It’s already being done, champ. Maybe you should stay home if you can’t handle normal society. Yes, I made the “decision” to have kids, you make it sound like a bad decision. Really?

    Yeah, crying babies suck. Even as a parent, I don’t like them. I also don’t like drunk doofuses that yell, stumble, or generally act like idiots. Therefore, those types of people should also be banned from bars. Unfortunately, that won’t happen because they are the ones spending the money.

    Danger to my kids? Really? I haven’t heard of many child deaths or even injuries that occurred in a bar, would you please cite some? Besides the fact that, being a parent, I usually leave early to get them in bed. I’m gone before 10 PM. I’m gone before most people are falling down drunk, then again, I tend to go to places that have a little more class than that.

    So is there no good time for a parent to enjoy a brew or two in public without having to get a babysitter? That’s a little ludicrous. Your comments go so far as to indicate it is unwise to bring my baby to a restaurant. Or on a plane. Maybe even in a store that sells children’s clothing. Any other “dangerous” places you can warn me of?

    In summary, all I can say is you show your ignorance when you make these comments. Unfortunately, I am a spiteful type of person and seeing that it makes people mad makes me want to bring my kids more often. Maybe you have good reason, but don’t so blatantly expound on your reasoning if it’s only driven by ignorance.


  6. rhino | Wednesday, March 3, 2010

    i’m sorry about your uterus


  7. Erin | Thursday, March 4, 2010

    Beer Wench, You’ve got some valid points. I know if I was enjoying a martini at the Zig Zag Cafe, I’d be pretty annoyed at a screaming child. I guess it is situational for me.


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